GLOBAL VISION PROJECT: Global Vision of Rehabilitation
and Recreation for People with Disabilities in the 21st Century


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PART I -- Welcome to the GVP Homepage

Think Globally and Act Locally

Our aim is to foster the development of adapted, special, and therapeutic activity, play, and recreation for people with disabilities -- globally and locally.

We hope that you will think globally and act locally to start, or expand, or improve special play and recreation for people with disabilities.

The ideas and guidelines in these articles are adaptable to every local community because the desire and the need to play and recreate are universal.

But, for people who are disabled the opportunity to play and recreate is limited or does not exist.

Our Goals in the 21st Century Are To ...

1. Advocate a global vision of people with disabilities in which they achieve their highest potential medically, educationally, recreationally, socially, and vocationally.

2. Advocate the development of adapted, special, and therapeutic activity, play, and recreation for every person who is disabled -- every infant, child, youth, adult, and senior.

3. Advocate
the right to the growth, health, well being, healing, and happiness of play and recreation for every person who is disabled.

4. Advocate goals, principles, and standards including:

The Credo of Special Play and Recreation.

The Decalogue of Advocacy for Special Play and Recreation.

The International Declaration of Special Play and Recreation Rights and
Responsibilities of People with Disabilities.

The Rehabilitation International Charter for the Third Millennium.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

The United Nations Declaration of Rights of the Disabled Persons.

5. Publish a WEBSITE that serves the nearly 200 Member Nations of the United Nations, the UN Specialized Agencies, and the 1,000 non-governmental organizations that work with the United Nations.

6. Assign first priority to serving the developing nations.

7. Focus
on personal needs and community-based potentials in play and recreation for people with disabilities around the globe.

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INDEX OF ARTICLES
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Public Domain:
The GVProject Website and all articles are published in the Public Domain. Any article or information on the GVP WEBSITE may be copied, forwarded, published, printed, and/or reproduced. It is requested:

1. That the author or source of any article or information be cited.
2. That GVP WEBSITE be cited as the source of article or information.
3. That the GVP WEBSITE Secretariat/Clearinghouse (SRDI) be informed of the use made of the articles and website, electronically or in print.
4. That copies of printed or published material be sent to the WEBSITE Secretariat/Clearinghouse.

I N T E R N E T  and  W E B S I T E   I N F O R M A T I O N

GVP Website Sponsors
*--Special Recreation for disABLED International and
*--Disability International Foundation

GVP Addresses
Website: http://www.globalvisionproject.org
Email: <gvp@globalvisionproject.org>

GVP Website Editor-in-Chief
Special Recreation for disABLED International (SRDI)
Since 1978: Play, Recreation, Leisure for ALL People with Disabiliaties Globally
Professor John Arthur Nesbitt, Ed.D., CTRS, SRDI President/CEO
701 Oaknoll Drive, Iowa City, IA 52246-5168 USA
Telephone 319/466-3192 ----- Receptionist 319/351-1720
Email <john-nesbitt@uiowa.edu> ----- Fax--319/351-6772 ATT NESBITT

Sources for Information
Website 1: Global Vision disABLED Project
http://www.globalvisionproject.org
75 articles, 300 pp:
Email: <gvp@globalvisionproject.org>

Website 2: Stop Fireworks Victimization, Fireworks Safety
http://www.bailiwick.lib.uiowa.edu/fireworks/

Email: <john-nesbitt@uiowa.edu>

Website 3: Eric Microfiche
http://www.eduref.org/ERIC, enter "Nesbitt, John A." for 24 articles on SPECIAL camping, leisure, play, and recreation, 2,500 pp. click advanced search,
Email <john-nesbitt@uiowa.edu>

Website 4: Disability International Foundation
http://www.teleport.com/~dif

Disabilty International Foundation
Mrs. Grace Demmery Reynolds, President
P.O. Box 1781, Longview, WA 98632 USA, Longview, WA 98632
Telephone 360/577-0243 ----- Fax 360/577-1114
Web Site http://home.teleport.com/!dif
Email <dif@adelphia.net>

GVP Server Host
Charles C. Dixon, MS, CTRS, Webmaster, Therapeutic Recreation Directory and compuTR Web Designs
*http://www.compuTRnet.com

Contact Information for TR Directory and compuTR Web Designs
*** www.recreationtherapy.com or www.compuTRnet.com

GVP Internet/Web Technical Assistance

Lisa Lord, Web Developer, Head of Reference, University of Iowa Libraries, Iowa

Mary Noth and Barbara Yoder, Coordinators, Johnson County Community Network, Johnson County, Iowa and Empower Computing

James John Quigley, Web Developer/Webmaster: Pepperwood/Sand Prairie Preservation, Iowa
< jquigley@avalon.net>

Ann M. Roller, Web Developer, Linden Tree Web Works http://www.lindentreewebworks.com,
" Web Design for the Bottom Line"

Michael S. Watters, Webmaster: Play, Recreation, and Leisure Management,
http://www.prlmanagement.com

Acknowledgements of GVP Assistance
Disability International Foundation, Washington
Johnson County Community Network, Iowa
National Organization on Disability, Washington, D.C.
People to People Program, Committee on Disability, Kansas City
Therapeutic Recreation Directory, West Virginia
University of Iowa Libraries, Internet Technical Support, Iowa

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PART II -- Welcome to the Global Vision Project

"Global Vision of Rehabilitation and Recreation
for People with Disabilities in the 21st Century"

"... Our global vision ... for the 21st Century is ...

... that every person with a disability shall achieve her or his highest potential educationally, medically, recreationally, socially, and vocationally ...

... that play and recreation shall be provided to meet growth, treatment, rehabilitation, healing, and health needs of all people with disabilities, in institutions and in the community ...

... that human rights to play and recreation shall be provided ensuring equality, access, choice, and fulfillment of people with disabilities ...

... that each person with disability shall achieve her or his fair share of life's joys and pleasures and happiness through play and recreation ...."
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Table of Contents

CHAPTER--I--OUR PROBLEMS: Our People with Disabilities and Our Disabilities
Contents ...
500,000,000 Disabled ... Forced Nothing-Time and Isolation ... Growth, Healing Denied ... Ignorance and Ostracism ... Lowest Income ... Marginalization ... Prejudice and Exclusion ... Sub-Standard Lives ...
Sub-Standard Recreation Patterns ... Universal Unmet Needs ...
"Us Versus Them" ....

CHAPTER--II--OUR GOALS: Our Global Vision Project Goals
Contents ...
Highest Potential ... Every Community ...
Serve United Nations Member Nations ... Developing Nations ...
Advocacy for Equality ... Funding ... Public Funds ...
Voluntary Donations ... Commercial Leisure Industry ...
Prevention and Safety ... An Invitation ....

CHAPTER--III--THE SOLUTIONS: Institutionally-Based and Community-Based
Contents ...
Solving Problems ... Institution-Based Solutions ...
Community-Based Solutions

CHAPTER--IV--THE ACTION: Think Globally and Act Locally
Contents ...
Action ... New Millennium ... Rate Home Base ... Adopt, Adapt, Act ....

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CHAPTER--I--OUR PROBLEMS: Our People with Disabilities and Our Disabilities

I.A. 500,000,000 People with Disability.
The world's 500,000,000 infants, children, youth, adults, and seniors with disabilities are one of the world's largest minorities, segregated by prejudice, barriers, and injustice.

I.B. Forced Nothing-time and Isolation.
Institutionalization and unemployment cause forced nothing-time in the lives of people with disabilities. The lack of transportation and lack of access to play and recreation combine to cause isolation from the community. Forced nothing-time and isolation make play and recreation more important to people with disabilities than to non-disabled.

I.C. Growth, Healing Denied. Infants and children are denied play's natural benefits of growth, development, joy, healing, and therapy. Youth, adults, and seniors are denied the natural pleasure, well being, healing, and therapy that recreation provides.

I.D. Ignorance and Ostracism. Ignorance of disease, rehabilitation, and the ability of people with disabilities has fostered a world of unrelenting physical and social barriers. These barriers deny access to play and recreation areas, facilities, and transportation. The result is de facto ostracism from community and community play and recreation.

I.E. Lowest Income. People with disabilities are among the lowest income people in the world. Thus, it is difficult or impossible for them to purchase basic products and services, especially the purchase of play and recreation products and services. It is even more difficult or impossible for them to purchase the adapted, special, or therapeutic play and recreation products and services that are required to meet special needs.

I.F. Marginalization. The individual play and recreation needs, rights, and aspirations of 500,000,000 people with disabilities are marginalized. The growth, development, health, and healing benefits of play and recreation are lost. Human rights to equality and inclusion are denied. Aspirations for personal achievement, pleasure, and fulfillment are suppressed.

I.G. Prejudice and Exclusion. Prejudice against people with disability is pervasive. Indifference to people with disability is an alternative form of prejudice. Prejudice and indifference are the matrix of social exclusion, inequality, and injustice. Prejudice excludes people from play and recreation.

I.H. Sub-Standard Lives. 500,000,000 people live sub-standard lives -- educationally, medically, recreationally, socially, and vocationally.

I.I. Sub-Standard Recreation Patterns. The play and recreation life patterns of people with disabilities are sub-standard. They are below and well below the non-disabled middle-class and upper-class patterns of play and recreation. The lifetime play and recreation patterns of people with disparities do not meet their basic needs in play and recreation activities at any age levels.

I.J. Universal Unmet Needs. There is a universal need in ALL institutions and in ALL communities for enhanced special play and recreation for people with disabilities. This need exists in the least developed nations, in the developing nations, and in the developed nations.

I.K. "Us Versus Them." Ten percent-plus of the world's population are disabled. Ninety percent-minus are non-disabled. Many non-disabled behave as if life is, "Us (the non-disabled) Versus Them (the disabled)." The non-disabled behavior expresses the de facto attitude, "Too bad they [the disabled] have that problem [disability]."

The Global Vision Project believes,

"... All of us inhabit this earth, together, a human family. Our family has a problem -- disability. Only all of us, together, our entire family, can solve our disability problem ...

"... We can provide rehabilitation services that bring all people to their full potential including their play and recreation potential ...

"... We can assure equality in all life functions for all people including equality in play and recreation."

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CHAPTER--II--OUR GOALS: Our Global Vision Mission! And Your Mission, Too?

The Mission of the Global Vision Project is:

II.A. HIGHEST POTENTIAL. We advocate a global vision of rehabilitation and recreation for people with disabilities in the 21st Century in which every person with a disability achieves her or his her highest potential educationally, medically, recreationally, socially, and vocationally;

II.B. EVERY INSTITUTION, EVERY COMMUNITY. We advocate global development, expansion, initiation, and improvement of adapted, special, and therapeutic play and recreation activity for people with disabilities in every institution and community in the world through:

II.B.1. Treatment and rehabilitation's inclusion of play and recreation therapies in institutions (clinics, hospitals) and community-based rehabilitation;
II.B.2. Institutional (clinic, hospital, school) and residential care inclusion of special play and recreation;
II.B.3. Community education, employment, family, settlement, and recreation;
II.B.4. Community-based rehabilitation with community-based special recreation;
II.B.5. Community-based special play and recreation; and,
II.B.6. Community-based play and recreation provided by commercial, governmental, non-governmental, and voluntary agencies and organizations.

II.C. GVP WEBSITE Service to UN Member Nations. The GVP WEBSITE serves:

II.C.1. 187 Member Nations of the UN and their national organizations;
II.C.2. The United Nations and the UN Specialized Agencies (UNSAs); and,
II.C.3. 1,000 non-governmental organizations with the UN and UNSAs.
II.C.4. All institutions and all communities in starting, expanding, or improving their special play and recreation services.

II.D. GVP PRIORITIES Are Developing Nations. The GVP WEBSITE priorities are:
First,
least developed nations;
Second, developing nations; and,
Third, developed nations.

II.E.
GVP ADVOCACY FOR EQUALITY. We advocate goals, standards, and statements of principle intended to achieve equalization and rehabilitation services for people with disabilities including:

Credo of Special Play and Recreation.
Decalogue of Advocacy for Special Play and Recreation for People with Disabilities in the 21st Century.
Four Freedoms of People with Disabilities in the 21st Century.
International Declaration of Special Play and Recreation Rights and Responsibilities of People with Disabilities.
United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights and recreation citations.
United Nations Declaration of Rights of the Disabled Persons, related charters, conventions, declarations that advance the lives of disABLED, and the play and recreation citations in all of these documents.

II.F. Advocacy for Funding for Special Play and Recreation.
We advocate funding for adapted, special, and therapeutic play and recreation. It is universally recognized that funds are limited for education, medical and health, social service, and vocational rehabilitations for people with disabilities. What funding sources are there for special play and recreation. There are three sources: two current sources and one possible source:

II.F.1. Public Tax Funds. A rightful share of funds for special play and recreation populations should be drawn from existing public, tax supported, government funds for arts, culture, forests and heritage, natural resources, parks, and recreation and directed to special populations. The cost per capita to serve special populations is higher than for the general population. Public funds should be provided to meet basic public responsibilities.

II.F.2. Voluntary Donations
. Civil society has responded to needs by donating funds for special arts, special camps, special Olympics, special sports, and special projects like "Make A Wish." Middle and upper class civil society will respond to expressed needs, good projects, professional management, economic efficiency, and good results.

II.F.3. Commercial Leisure Industry.
The spending on commercial consumption of luxury leisure products and services" for the able-bodied middle and upper classes is vast. Luxury leisure spending on cruises, entertainment, electronic entertainment, equipment, media, tourism, vehicles, etc., yields levels of activity that vastly exceed individual basic play and recreation needs. There is the possibility of appealing for funds for special play and recreation from the commercial luxury leisure industries.

II.G. PREVENTION AND SAFETY. We advocate prevention, risk-control, and safe practices that prevent deaths, injuries, and disability. Specifically, the GVProject advocates and provides guidelines for prevention in three areas:

II.G.1. Prevention of Aquatics Injuries and Disabilities.
II.G.2. Prevention of Play and Recreation Injuries and Disabilities.
II.G.3. Prevention of Fireworks Victimization Deaths, Injuries, and Disabilities.

AN INVITATION. The Global Vision Project Mission is OUR MISSION. We invite you to adopt, adapt, and act on the Global Vision Project as YOUR MISSION.

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CHAPTER--III--THE SOLUTIONS: Institutionally-Based and Community-Based

III.A. Solving Problems.
There has been significant progress from 1950 to 2000 play and recreation for people with disabilities. However, development has come only a short way. The past was characterized by reactive responses.
The New Millennium can be characterized by proactive action. Current generations are challenged to surpass the generations of the 1950 to 2000 years.

Universally, those served, those under-served and those un-served need improved, increased, and expanded adapted, special, and therapeutic play and recreation services. These needs exist in developed and developing nations. The are two basic solutions to meeting the needs for play and recreation of people with disabilities -- institutionally-based service and community-based service.

III.B.1. Institution-Based Solution.
Adapted, special, and therapeutic play and recreation are needed in institutions (clinics, hospitals, rehabilitation services, long-term institutional treatment and care, and residential care). Play for ill or injured children on hospital wards is basically the same "Play Lady" who helps the children through play -- in any nation, developed or developing. The "Art Therapist" or "Therapeutic Recreation Specialist" bring healing treatment and activities to children, youth, adults, and seniors -- anywhere in the world.

III.B.2. Typical Institution-Based Program. Typical institution-based (hospital, institutional care, residential care) adapted, special, or therapeutic play and recreation service include elements including:

III.B.2.a. Therapy. Therapeutic play and recreation activities such as Aquatic Therapy, Art Therapy, Dance Therapy, Drama Therapy, Music Therapy, Play Therapy, Therapeutic Recreation, or Writing/Poetry Therapy; and,

III.B.2.b. Adapted/Special. Adapted or special play and recreation activities such as Activity, Animals/Pets, Bibliotherapy, Camping/Outdoor Recreation, Hippotherapy, Horticulture Therapy, Humor/Laughter Therapy, Phototherapy, Puppetry, or Sports; and;

III.B.2.c. Education. Play and recreation education (classes, workshops), advising and counseling (one on one, small group);

III.B.2.d Technology and Information. Play and recreation assistive devices and computer technology support service; and, play and recreation information and referral support service; and,

III.B.2.e. Administration. Professional administrative organization including Director, Supervisors, Leaders, Volunteers, and Support Services, Drivers; internal budget and external funding; play and recreation areas, equipment, facilities, supplies, vehicles; professional in-service training for professionals, sub-professionals, support staff, volunteers, and interns/students; and, program evaluation and research.

III.B.2.f. Progression and Transition. A patient, client, member, or participant moves on a continuum from dependence to independence in play and recreation and from the institution to community. The patient or client progresses from a functional low starting point in play and recreation to the highest possible level of function in play and recreation.

The INSTITUTION-BASED program provides for this continuum. Arrangements (liaison, cooperation, coordination) are made for the person's move from the institution recreation service to the community-base special recreation service. Ultimately, the person functions independently using community play and recreation resources.

III.C.1. Typical Community-Based.
The GVP Project WEBSITE "Guidelines to Community-Based Special Recreation" are adaptable for:

Community-Based Rehabilitation including Community-Based Special Recreation;
and,
Community-Based Special Recreation provided by a Community: parks, recreation, youth, and other community-based play and recreation service.

III.C.2. Typical Community-Based Program.
Communities-based special play and recreation programs, for communities of 25,000 population up to millions, provide community-based special play and recreation program with elements including:

III.C.2.a. People served: people with disabilities, types and age levels with data and tracking on people served, under-served and unserved.

III.C.2.b. Play and Recreation Activities: choice, skill, and age oriented.

III.C.2.c. Recreation Program:
total of recreation activities and services.

III.C.2.d. Recreation Education:
instruction, classes, workshops.

III.C.2.e. Recreation Advising/Counseling:
informal/formal, ind./small group.

III.C.2.f. Recreation Assistive Devices:
assistive devices, info/referral.

III.C.2.g. Recreation Computer Technology:
instruction, support, info/referral.

III.C.2.h. Recreation Information and Referral:
local, state, national, intl.

III.C.2.i. Recreation Funding:
internal and external funding, special funding.

III.C.2.j. Recreation Administration:
staff including Director, Supervisors, Leaders, Volunteers, Support Staff, Drivers, areas, equipment, facilities, supplies, vehicles, etc.

III.C.2.k. Recreation In-Service Training:
for professionals, sub-professionals, support staff; consumers; interns/students; parents; and volunteers.

III.C.2.l. Recreation Policy and Plan:
proactive policy-making body, proactive administrative planning (short-, -middle, or long-range planning).

III.C.2.m. Recreation Evaluation and Research:
recreation personnel; benefits to participants of activities and program; and program evaluation and research.

III.C.2.n. Recreation Contribution to Community and Institutions:
recreation service contribution to the overall play and recreation quality of life of people with disabilities in the local institutions (hospitals, residential care); community-based rehabilitation, community-based special play and recreation; and, the community at large.

III.C.2.o. Progression and Transition. A patient, client, member, or participant moves on a continuum from dependence to independence in play and recreation and from the institution to community. The patient or client progresses from a functional low starting point in play and recreation to the highest possible level of function in play and recreation.

The COMMUNITY-BASED program provides for this continuum. Arrangements (liaison, cooperation, coordination) are made for the person's move from the institution recreation service to the community-base special recreation service. Ultimately, the person functions independently using community play and recreation resources.

"... The challenge in the New Millennium is to "Think Globally and Act Locally" to start, to expand, and to improve special play and recreation for people with disabilities in institutions and in the community ...."

CHAPTER--IV--THE ACTION: Think Globally and Act Locally

Action. Statements of principles and goals have been adopted by the United Nations and others. Too often, the action stops with the adoption. Too many individuals, civil societies, governments, and organizations do little beyond the adoption stage. The New Millennium is the time for action.

New Millennium.
The GVProject challenges us, you, and those around you, to go beyond the "adoption stage" and to confront the unfinished business of the 20th Century. We are challenged to confront the New Millennium. The New Millennium provide an opportunity to make new commitments to confront old problems. The New Millennium provides an opportunity to meet the new and emerging challenges and opportunities inherent in rehabilitation of people with disabilities.

Rate Home-Base. As you peruse the articles you will see various "principles" and "guides" that have been fashioned into "action checklists" and "performance rating scales." Doing something with or for people with disabilities may start with one of these checklists, just by asking the questions. Start with your institution or community or program or service. In the New Millennium, decide to be part of the solutions to problems.

Adopt, Adapt, Act.
In pursuing the GVProject Mission, we urge you ADOPT a principle or guideline. ADAPT it to your institutions, your community and your nation. ACT to create the reality of play and recreation participation for people with disabilities.

GLOBAL VISION PROJECT:
Global Vision of Rehabilitation and Recreation
for People with Disabilities in the 21st Century
A JOINT PROJECT BY:
Disability International Foundation AND
Special Recreation for disABLED International

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INDEX OF ARTICLES
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Bobby Approved (v 3.1)